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Elevated Nest of the Lutescent Warbler

Henry W. Carriger
Publication Information
Journal: 
Condor
Volume: 
1
Issue: 
4 (July-August)
Section: 
Echoes from the Field
Year: 
1899
Pages: 
72
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PDF icon p0072-p0072.pdf97.16 KB

Elevated Nest of the Lutescent Warbler.

On May 31, 1897. I found a nest of the Lutescent Warbler placed three feet from the ground in a bunch of vines. It was loosely constructed of a quantity of dry leaves, grass and skeletons of leaves, lined with hair and fine grass. On May 3, 1899, while walking along a creek about one quarter of a mile from where I had found the nest in 1897, I flushed a bird from a nest in an oak tree, and was surprised to see it was a Lutescent Warbler. The nest was six feet from the ground and three feet from the trunk of the tree. A horizontal limb branched out from the tree and a small branch stuck up from it for about eight inches, and over this was a great quantity of Spanish moss (Ramalina retiformis), which fell over the horizontal limb. The nest is quite bulky, composed of leaves, grass and bark strips, lined with hair and fine grass, and was partially supported by both limbs and the moss, which is all about it and which forms quite a cover for the eggs. At this date the eggs were about to hatch and could not be saved.

HENRY W. CARRIGER

Sonoma, Cal.

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